Garage Flooring Rolls Ideas

Garage flooring rolls warms up any room with its rich golden color. I, a hardwood, am valuable for its durability in the manufacture of floors, furniture and cabinets. If you have a concrete floor in a basement or a converted garage, you can install solid oak flooring, but your finished floor will be about 2-1 / 4 inches higher than the concrete because you have to install a moisture barrier and hit the floor before lying oak.

Black Garage Flooring Rolls

Black Garage Flooring Rolls

Instructions

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Place a polyethylene vapor barrier on top of the Garage flooring rolls. This comes in large rolls that you can measure and cut to fit the mat on the floor. Overlap cut edges at least 6 inches. Mount the floor frame that will support your oak floor plank. The floor frame consists of two-inch with 4-inch, treated dimensional slices. Measure and cut a board that fits along the longest wall. Use a circle saw. Attach the board to the concrete floor along the wall. Fill the screws every 24 inches. You need an impact drill to insert the screws.

Cut and measure another three slices to fit along the other Garage flooring rolls and install them in the same way. Measure and install dimensional discs inside the frame you just built on top of the steam barrier. Slide the discs 16 inches apart and put concrete screws at a speed of one screw each 24 inches. Place the first oak plank in a corner of the room, run it at right angles to the dimensional boards below. Use ΒΌ inch distances along the wall to keep the plank from touching the wall. The “groove” side of the board faces the wall and the “heavy” side is facing outwards.